Seminar Overview




 

So you're interesting in making and finishing your own watch, but what will you actually be doing? The Seminar weekend is a tour through some of the most sought-after finishing found on modern watches, all done by you. Join our expert watchmakers as they teach the theory and history behind what makes your watch tick, then guide you through each process with careful and accessible tuition.

We also offer bespoke packages and can arrange weekends for groups of friends,
colleagues or anything in between.

Get in touch to find out more.

 
 
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The Watch

Unique. Original. Hand finished by you to keep forever.

Based on the famous Unitas 6497, well known for its robust and reliable running, the IWS watch is tailored to your tastes with a range of dials, bezels and crowns. Further to this, the movement becomes totally unique due to your hand finishing. Fitted to a leather strap of your choice further increases the uniqueness. 

There is also the opportunity to upgrade your movement with premium finishes, such as snailed ratchet wheels, or a skeletonised balance bridge. For an extra luxurious finish there are also a range of strap upgrade options in exotic leathers.


The Weekend

Of course it's not only about the watch; you're here to enjoy yourself. The Seminar is a full weekend experience, and so we look after you over the whole two days.

Expect lunch on both days as well as a team meal and drinks Saturday night to talk about all the good (and bad) things you've learned and done.

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The Watchmakers

James Harris: After attending Birmingham School of Jewellery to gain one of the world's first BA degree in Horology, James has worked for companies such as Omega and Tag Heuer before becoming an independent to work on more varied and exciting projects.

Johan ten Hoeve: A second-generation horologist, Johan trained in Conservation and Restoration at West Dean College. Johan has worked on several prestigious clockmaking projects including the Thompion clock replica which can now be seen in the Greenwich observatory.